Devotion: Dad, will you come play with me?

by / Comments Off on Devotion: Dad, will you come play with me? / 9 View / December 2, 2011

“The Spirit you received does not make you slaves, so that you live in fear again; rather, the Spirit you received brought about your adoption to sonship. And by him we cry, ‘Abba, Father.’ The Spirit himself testifies with our spirit that we are God’s children.” Romans 8:15-16 (NIV)

One of my favorite things to do is to play with my son, Joel. Usually that means constructing something with Legos, building with blocks or maybe inventing a land filled with animals. It is fun to spend time with him, working together to make something new. It is also fun to help him construct things beyond his ability and imagination.

At my church we recently started an after school program for kids in the neighborhood. After a message from God’s Word and a healthy snack, we play with the kids. As Plato said: “You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation.” To be sure, we have learned a lot about these kids by playing. One thing I have learned is that some of them don’t have fathers who play with them; some of them don’t have fathers at all. Statics have shown that 60% of kids in the city don’t have fathers with whom they can play.

This helps me appreciate St. Paul’s words in Romans as he writes:

“For you did not receive a spirit that makes you a slave again to fear, but you received the Spirit of sonship. And by him we cry, ‘Abba, Father.’ The Spirit himself testifies with our spirit that we are God’s children.” (Romans 8:15-16).

Because of Jesus, we all have a Father. We come to the Father through Jesus (John 14:6) and like him, we go to our Father in Heaven through prayer. Being a father makes me think of prayer in a whole new way. It’s as if I were asking Almighty God, the Maker of the heavens and earth, to come play with me. How exciting is that?!

What is it you want to do with His help? What things do you want His involvement in? Imagine God “coming to play” with us as we seek to build and rebuild families, congregations, communities, and lives in Christ. No doubt he can help us construct things that are beyond our ability and imagination.

Do you think he’ll come? He doesn’t tell us to call him “Father” for nothing!

Dad, will you come and play with us?

Have a great day in the Lord!